To Beat Harsh Winters, Indian Army Looks To Passive Solar Heating In Ladakh


To Beat Harsh Winters, Indian Army Looks To Passive Solar Heating In Ladakh

Ladakh accounts for more than two-thirds of the land area of the Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir. As a high altitude cold desert, though, it hosts only about 5% of the state’s population. It does, though, host a large number of Indian Army personnel, as Ladakh is where two of the longest unresolved border disputes in the world – between India and China to the east, and between India and Pakistan to the west – are still ongoing. As a result, the Indian Army has to transport a very large amount of fuel to keep its soldiers warm in the harsh, high altitude climate.

With the mercury dipping to minus 20 degrees Celsius or lower during winter nights, and about minus 5 degrees Celsius at night during March and April, it becomes virtually impossible to live without proper heating.
To top it, Ladakh is not connected to the national electricity grid. It has a few areas that get power from local hydropower plants while de-centralised solar power helps in many other remote areas but is highly inadequate. Read More…

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